Wednesday, 16 November 2011

Rare photographs of Bangalore -- Part II

Here are more old photographs of Bangalore:
Photograph of the Halsur Tank, Bangalore, from the Macnabb Collection (Col James Henry Erskine Reid): Album of Indian views, taken in 1902 . The lake or tank lies to the North-West of Ulsur (Halsur) which is situated east of Bangalore. J.W. Morris in the 'Guide to Bangalore and Mysore Directory 1905' said that the condition of the lake was regarded as dangerous to public health because of the weed-choked, shallow waters and many a European Soldier drowned here, perhaps caught in the weeds and lotus plants. In the early 20th century water-works for supplying the European Troops stationed here, were situated on the side of a rock adjoining the lake, but this was abandoned with the introduction of a piped water supply. The lake with a garden near by is a popular attraction today.
This photograph of the interior of the Durbar Hall, Palace, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'. "The entire right wing of the palace consists of a spacious hall, lofty, and well-lighted by bay-windows. The design and construction are modern, as also the furniture and hangings. It is here that the Maharaja holds his durbars, and receives distinguished visitors, when in Bangalore." A durbar is the court kept by an Indian ruler, a public audience or levee held by a native prince, or by a British governor or viceroy in India.
This view of the ruined fort at Bangalore was taken by Nicholas Bros in the 1860s to form part of an album entitled 'Photographs of India and Overland Route'. It shows two masonry-built battered round bastions in a style typical of defensive architecture in India throughout the medieval and modern periods. The site was originally the location of a mud fort built by a Vijayanagar chieftain in 1537. The existing fort was built Haidar Ali in 1761 and was later occupied by his son, Tipu Sultan. The fort is unusual in its oval shape. It originally had eight gates. Only the Delhi Gate, which is particularly known for its fine plasterwork motifs, remains.
A photograph of the Band Stand at the Lal Bagh Gardens in Bangalore from the 'Vibart Collection of Views in South India' taken by by an unknown photographer about 1855. These pleasure gardens belonged to Haidar Ali and later his son Tipu Sultan. It was made into a horticultural garden in 1856 under the management of a professional Superintendent. A Band Stand was soon added from where music was played in the evenings. Later a handsome and spacious conservatory was built, the foundation stone of which was laid on the eve of the visit of Prince Albert Victor Wales to the gardens.
This photograph of the Victoria Jubilee Hospital, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'. "The Victoria Diamond Jubilee Hospital, Bangalore City... constructed in commemoration of the auspicious occasion of the completion of the sixtieth year of the reign of Her Most Gracious Majesty, the Queen-Empress of India. The foundation stone was laid by H.H. the Maharani-Regent on Diamond Jubilee day, 22nd June, 1897. It is intended as a charitable institution for the purpose of affording medical relief to sufferers of all classes without distinction as to caste, creed, or color. It was opened on the 8th December 1900, by His Excellency Lord Curzon of Kedleston."
Photograph of pupils from the matriculation class at Bangalore High School in Karnataka from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (Volume 46), taken by an unknown photographer in 1866. This image shows the European master seated at the table in the centre surrounded by his pupils. The Imperial Gazetteer of India states, "There are three classes of secondary schools - the vernacular and English middle schools, and the high schools...The English secondary school stage is divided into middle and high school sections, which really form portions of the same course...the English school education should ordinarily be completed by the time the pupil attained the age of sixteen...In English secondary schools the main course has hitherto led up to the matriculation or entrance examination of one or other of the Universities. There are other courses of a more practical character leading up to different examinations...A purely literary education has been more popular among both parents and students, as being in itself more attractive to them and as affording a better opening for remunerative employment. The matriculation has generally been accepted as a qualifying test by Government and private employers as well as by the Universities, and has been regarded as the common goal of the school career."
This photograph of Glass House at Lal Bagh Gardens, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'. The Glass House at the Lal Bagh Gardens was built to commemorate Prince Albert's visit to Bangalore. The foundation stone was laid by the Prince on 30 November 1889. It was a popular venue for horticultural shows and competitions.
Photograph of the Halsur Tank, Bangalore, from the Macnabb Collection (Col James Henry Erskine Reid): Album of Indian views, taken in 1902 . The lake or tank lies to the North-West of Ulsur (Halsur) which is situated east of Bangalore. J.W. Morris in the 'Guide to Bangalore and Mysore Directory 1905' said that the condition of the lake was regarded as dangerous to public health because of the weed-choked, shallow waters and many a European Soldier drowned here, perhaps caught in the weeds and lotus plants. In the early 20th century water-works for supplying the European Troops stationed here were situated on the side of a rock adjoining the lake, but this was abandoned with the introduction of a piped water supply. The lake with a garden near by is a popular attraction today.
This photograph of the Head Works and Sluice, Chamaraj Water Works, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'.Caption notes with the album read, "Constructed for the water supply of Bangalore and named 'The Chamrajendra Water Works' after his late Highness. The embankment, which is thrown across the Arkavati River, dams back 767 c. ft. of water from catchment of 212 square miles. The inception of the scheme is due to Sir Sheshadri Iyer, the Dewan."A Dewan is the Minister of Finance.
Photograph of a group of 24 girls and their teacher at the London Mission Girls' Boarding School, Bangalore, taken by Henry Dixon in the 1860s. This photograph is from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections and was shown at the 1867 Paris Exhibition. The state of Mysore was one of the most progressive regions in pre-independent India. It was a pioneer in establishing modern systems of education; the London Mission was the first school for girls in Mysore, established in Bangalore city in 1840. The photographer was Capt. Henry Dixon of the 22nd Regiment, Madras Native Infantry.
Photograph of a stone slab with a relief sculpture of a battle scene, and a Kanarese inscription above, from Begur in Karnataka from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (volume 21, 'a' numbers), taken by Henry Dixon in the 1860s. Begur is a village south of Bangalore which has two twin granite temples, probably dating from the end of the Ganga period, eleventh century.
Photograph of Mr. Brett's house at Hosur, Tamil Nadu from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (volume 21, 'a' numbers) taken by Henry Dixon in the early 1860s. This view looks across the garden and along the drive towards the house, with the entrance and a porte-cochère at the right. Built in the form of a mediaeval castle by the Collector Mr Brett (1859-62), this building served as the divisional officer's 'bungalow'. It was purchased by the Government in 1875 and was known locally as The Castle.
Photograph of a general view of the house known locally as The Castle, from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections: India Office Series (volume 21, 'a' numbers) taken by Henry Dixon in the early 1860s. Built in the form of a mediaeval castle by the Collector Mr Brett (1859-62), this building served as the divisional officer's 'bungalow'. It was purchased by the Government in 1875. The family group gathered on the verandah is possibly the Bretts.

2 comments:

  1. It might be appropriate to mention that these photos and text have been sourced from the British Library.

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