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Tuesday, 15 November 2011

Rare photographs of Bangalore -- Part I

Found some old and rare photographs of Bangalore. Here are a few of them:
This photograph of the Palace, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'.General view of the buildings, built in castle form, with a large group seated in carriages in the foreground. Caption notes read: ''The Palace was built for H.H. the late Chama Rajendra Wodeyar Bahadur during his minority, and largely extended in his lifetime. It is a stone building of two storeys and, when lighted up at night, it presents an especially enchanting appearance. It stands well out on rising ground, in a very extensive park and is surrounded by parterres of flowers well laid out.'' 
A photograph of the Fort, Bangalore from the 'Vibart Collection of Views in South India' taken by an unknown photographer about 1855. Founded by Kempe Gowda in 1537, the cantonment was used in the early 18th century as a more salubrious location for the British garrison than the malaria-ridden island at Seringapatam. By the end of the century Bangalore was a well established and flourishing garrison town. It was sieged several times during the Anglo-Mysore Wars of the late 18th Century when the British fought against the Rajas of Mysore Haidar Ali (c.1722 - 1782) and his eldest son, Tipu Sultan (1753 -1799).
View of the Residency, Bangalore from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Souvenirs of Kolhapur. Installation of H.H. the Maharajah, 1894'. The Residency, or Raj Bhavan at Bangalore, Karnataka was constructed in the early 19th century, it is a low stucco building situated in a landscaped garden. Inside there is a magnificent ballroom. Bangalore was founded by Kempe Gowda, a feudatory chief of the Vijayanagar empire and became an important fortress under Haider Ali and Tipu Sultan in the late 18th century. The cantonment was founded in the early 18th century and a British garrison established here; the town continued to develop in the 19th century as a military and administrative centre.
View of the Residency, Bangalore from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Souvenirs of Kolhapur. Installation of H.H. the Maharajah, 1894'. The Residency, or Raj Bhavan at Bangalore, Karnataka was constructed in the early 19th century, it is a low stucco building situated in a landscaped garden. Inside there is a magnificent ballroom. Bangalore was founded by Kempe Gowda, a feudatory chief of the Vijayanagar empire and became an important fortress under Haider Ali and Tipu Sultan in the late 18th century. The cantonment was founded in the early 18th century and a British garrison established here; the town continued to develop in the 19th century as a military and administrative centre.
This photograph of the Lal Bagh Gardens, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'."This beautiful pleasure garden (now styled the Botanical Gardens) is situated about a mile to the south of the C. and M. Station, and covers an area of 100 acres. It was first laid out by Haidar Ali and enlarged by Tipu Sultan. The cypress trees of Haidar and Tipu's days, which overcrowded the narrow walks, have long since been removed, and only the unique specimens of Mangifera indica, which adorn the grounds, still remain. From 1838 the Lal Bagh has been under professional superintendents from Kew and has a wide reputation, its speciality, apart from the pleasure derived from the residents of Bangalore, being the acclimatisation of economic plants. It now contains a rare and valuable collection of tropical and sub-tropical plants, together with indigenous and foreign fruit trees." 
This photograph of the Government Museum, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'.The Museum was established by Dr E Balfour in 1865, and the building was completed in 1877. The entrance hall contains several specimens of ancient stone carvings, two of which are of special interest, one from Begur illustrates the former wars of the country. The date assigned to it is AD 1850. The other is dated AD 925. The halebid Temples are also represented by a few carvings supposed to be over a thousand years old. There is a fine cabinet with Roman coins ranging from BC 21 to AD 51, and are thus about 1900 years old. Mysore is represented by coins dating from AD 1578 to 1843, and there are trophies of the arms and armour used in the days of Haidar Ali and Tipu Sultan. 
Photograph of Band Stand and Promenade, Bangalore from an album entitled 'Views in Bangalore', of the Vibart Collection, taken by Albert Thomas Penn in the 1870s . Bangalore was founded by Kempe Gowda in the early 16th century and became an important fortress under Haider Ali and Tipu Sultan in the late 18th century. The cantonment was founded in the early 18th century and a British garrison established here; the town continued to develop in the 19th century as a military and administrative centre. This view shows the Bandstand and Promenade area.
Photograph of the United Services Club, Bangalore, from the Macnabb Collection (Col James Henry Erskine Reid): Album of Indian views, taken in 1902 . The United Services Bangalore Club (now called Bangalore Club) was established in 1868 for the exclusive use of British troops stationed in the cantonment. It has had many distinguished members including Sir Winston Churchill. 
Photograph of the Gymkhana, Bangalore, from the Macnabb Collection (Col James Henry Erskine Reid): Album of Indian views, taken in c.1902. Bangalore was founded by Kempe Gowda, a feudatory chief of the Vijayanagar empire, in the early 16th century and became an important fortress under Haider Ali and Tipu Sultan in the late 18th century. The cantonment was founded in the early 18th century and a British garrison established here; the town continued to develop in the 19th century as a military and administrative centre. The view shows the Gymkhana building on the General Parade Ground.
This photograph of the Public Offices, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'.The view is of the main fa├žade of the building situated in Cubbon Park, with an equestrian statue of Sir Mark Cubbon (longest serving Commissioner of Bangalore) on the right. Caption notes accompanying the album read, "Designed and built by Col (now Sir) Richard Sankey,1864-1868, for the Mysore Chief Commissioner's offices. The Mysore Government now holds its offices in the buildings, and the Council of Regency meets weekly in the large central hall upstairs."
This photograph of the Cubbon Park, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'. "The Park is named after Sir Mark Cubbon, Chief Commissioner of Mysore, and covers over a hundred acres. It contains the Public Offices, built in 1868, before which is an equestrian statue of Sir Mark Cubbon, the band promenade, and the Government Museum. In addition to carriage drives and broad promenades, there are many tortuous paths and shady nooks which all help to provide a pleasant retreat, whether for pleasure or rest", so reads the caption from the album, 'Souvenir of Mysore'.
This photograph of a Main Street, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'.The note accompanying this photograph reads, "On either side of the roadway there are open stalls or bazaars, where the tradesmen display their wares arranged in tiers of shelves, all within reach of the salesman, who sits ensconsed among them. Those of a trade generally flock together. During the busy hours of the morning and afternoon, the streets are so thronged with people as to remind one of the crowded thoroughfares of London."
A photograph of Lal Bagh, Bangalore from the 'Vibart Collection of Views in South India' taken by an unknown photographer about 1855. The Lal Bagh gardens were created in the late 18th Century by the Rajas of Mysore Haider Ali Khan, (c.1722 - 1782) and his son, Tipu Sultan (1753 -1799). This royal retreat was stocked with many rare and exotic varieties of plants and trees brought from Persia, Afghanistan and France. The conservatory (1840) was reputedly modelled on London’s Crystal Palace.
View of the the Lal Bagh Gardens in Bangalore from the 'Bellew Collection: Photograph album of Surgeon-General Henry Walter Bellew' taken by an unknown photographer in the 1860s. Bangalore, the capital of Karnataka, was founded in the 16th century by Kempe Gowda. The Lal Bagh Botanical Gardens were laid out in the 18th century by Haider Ali and expanded by his son Tipu Sultan. This view shows a fountain in the foreground, a bandstand beyond and is taken from the top of a tower. The bandstand dates from the mid 19th century. It has been used as the venue for flower shows and musical performances.
Photograph of the Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Souvenirs of Kolhapur. Installation of H.H. the Maharajah, 1894'. The Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka was built c.1865 and modified from 1881 onwards at huge cost. It was originally built for a local British merchant, Mr. Garrat but was taken over and extended for use by the Maharaja of Mysore. The outline of the palace with its fortified towers and turreted parapets is reminiscent of Windsor Castle, England upon which the palace at Bangalore was based. The palace stands in a large formal garden and covers an area of 13,7000 square metres.
Photograph of the Old Palace in the Fort in Bangalore from an album entitled 'Views in Bangalore', of the Vibart Collection, taken by Albert Thomas Penn in the 1870s .The view shows the arcade of pillars in Tipu Sultan''s Palace in the Fort at Bangalore.
Photograph of the Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Souvenirs of Kolhapur. Installation of H.H. the Maharajah, 1894'. The Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka was built in c.1865 and modified from 1881 onwards at huge cost. It was originally built for a local British merchant, Mr. Garrat but was taken over and extended for use by the Maharaja of Mysore. The outline of the palace with its fortified towers and turreted parapets is reminiscent of Windsor Castle, England upon which the palace at Bangalore was based. The palace stands in a large formal garden and covers an area of 13,7000 square metres. Near the entrance there is a large semicircular bay crowned by a cast-iron verandah.
Photograph of the Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Souvenirs of Kolhapur. Installation of H.H. the Maharajah, 1894'. The Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka was built in c. 865 and modified from 1881 onwards at huge cost. It was originally built for a local British merchant, Mr. Garrat but was taken over and extended for use by the Maharaja of Mysore. The outline of the palace with its fortified towers and turreted parapets is reminiscent of Windsor Castle, England upon which the palace at Bangalore was based. The palace stands in a large formal garden and covers an area of 13,7000 square metres.
Photograph of a park in Bangalore, from the Macnabb Collection (Col James Henry Erskine Reid): Album of Indian views, taken in 1902. Bangalore has been called the 'Garden City' for its spacious parks and flourishing greenery. It has two large parks-Cubbon Park and Lalbagh, along with numerous smaller ones such as Kensington gardens. The view is possibly of Cubbon Park, one of the principal parks of the city, covering over 210 hectares (296 acres) and designed by Sir Mark Cubbon (Commissioner of Mysore 1834-61) in 1864.
This photograph of the Someshwara Temple, Ulsoor, Bangalore taken in the 1890s by an unknown photographer, is from the Curzon Collection's 'Souvenir of Mysore Album'.The note attached to this photograph reads, "The temple, with its imposing gopara, appears to have been erected by Kempe Gauda in about 1570 A.D. The story of its origin is that Kempe Gauda, fatigued by hunting, rested under a tree and fell asleep on the present site of the temple. The god Somesvara appeared to him in a dream, revealing the existence of a hidden treasure and bidding him to build the temple with it."
Photograph of a temple at Begur in Karnataka, taken by Henry Dixon in c.1868, from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections. Begur is a village south of Bangalore. The twin granite Shiva temples found there, date probably from the end of the Ganga period, in the 11th century. They consists of two shrines side by side. This view shows the southern shrine, composed of many miniature shrines.
This photograph of the Lal Bagh Gardens was taken by Albert Thomas Penn in the 1870s and is from an album entitled 'Views in Bangalore', part of the Vibart Collection. The Lal Bagh gardens were created in the late 18th Century by the Rajas of Mysore Haider Ali Khan, (c.1722 - 1782) and his son, Tipu Sultan (1753 -1799). This royal retreat was stocked with many rare and exotic varieties of plants and trees brought from Persia, Afghanistan and France. In early 19th century the gardens were taken over by the East India Company and converted into a botanic garden.
Photograph of the Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Souvenirs of Kolhapur. Installation of H.H. the Maharajah, 1894'. The Maharaja’s Palace at Bangalore, Karnataka was built in c. 865 and modified from 1881 onwards at huge cost. It was originally built for a local British merchant, Mr. Garrat but was taken over and extended for use by the Maharaja of Mysore. The outline of the palace with its fortified towers and turreted parapets is reminiscent of Windsor Castle, England upon which the palace at Bangalore was based. The palace stands in a large formal garden and covers an area of 13,7000 square metres.
Photograph of the entrance gopura or gateway of the Ulsur temple in Bangalore, taken by Henry Dixon in c. 1868, from the Archaeological Survey of India Collections. This temple, the largest one in Bangalore, is consecrated to Someshvara. It was probably built in the early 17th century during the period of Hirya Kempe II of the Gowdas dynasty. The temple is situated in a walled compound and consists of a sanctuary with a surrounding passageway and a closed mandapa or hall. A large open mandapa in front has piers carved with yalis, mythical animals. The outer walls are decorated with figures carved in between pilasters. The pyramidal gopura or tower seen in this view is also richly carved with figures and architectural elements. In the foreground is a stambha or free-standing pillar.
View of the the Lal Bagh Gardens in Bangalore from the 'Bellew Collection: Photograph album of Surgeon-General Henry Walter Bellew' taken by an unknown photographer in the 1860s. Bangalore, the capital of Karnataka, was founded in the 16th century by Kempe Gowda. The Lal Bagh Botanical Gardens were laid out in the 18th century by Haider Ali and expanded by his son Tipu Sultan. This view of the gardens shows a single-storey European building flanked by two square towers.
Photograph of St. Mark's Church and Band Stand in Bangalore from an album entitled 'Views in Bangalore', of the Vibart Collection, taken by Albert Thomas Penn in the 1870s . St. Mark's Church is situated on the Parade Ground, Bangalore and is a mid-19th century building with distinct stucco decoration, a shallow dome and a domed aspe.

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